• Gender-based differences:  Male pathological gamblers tend to receive counselling about issues other than gambling less often than their female counterparts.
  • There is usually no single or specific cause for pathological or compulsive gambling – except in the case of people on medication for Parkinson’s disease or Restless Leg Syndrome, or those suffering from a bipolar disorder. Those on medication for Parkinson’s or RLS have been observed to develop compulsive gambling tendencies. The culprit seems to be the increased activity of the chemical messenger dopamine in the brain.  Similarly, one of the symptoms of a bipolar disorder is exorbitant spending, which is a form of compulsive gambling.
  • Gender-based differences in gambling addiction include: Men tend to become addicted to more interpersonal forms of gambling, like blackjack, craps or poker, whereas women tend to engage in less interpersonal forms of betting, like slot machines or bingo
  • Medical professionals should screen for a gambling addiction. Less than 10% of problem gamblers are diagnosed in a primary care setting. Answers to two quick questions provide a clue: Have you ever lied to someone important to you about your gambling and have you felt the need to gamble with more and more amounts of money?
  • Gambling addiction knows no gender: Although more men than women are thought to suffer from pathological gambling, women are developing this disorder at a higher rate, now comprising up to 25% of individuals with pathological gambling. Men tend to develop this disorder during their early teenage years, while women tend to develop it later. The disorder in women then tends to get worse at a much faster rate than in men.

     
What is
the NRGP?
Help available for
gambling problems
PUBLIC AWARENESS AND
PREVENTION
     
Read MoreRead MoreRead More
     
     
ASSISTANCE FOR GAMBLING
INDUSTRY PROFESSIONALS
National Schools
Programme
THE NRGP HANDBOOK, RESEARCH
AND OTHER INFORMATION
     
Read MoreRead MoreRead More